Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH) is a national engineering firm that designs, investigates, and rehabilitates structures, building enclosures, and materials.

Margulies Perruzzi helped SGH to update both their Boston and Waltham offices with a high-performance and sustainable workplace strategy, with open and efficient floor plans promoting collaborative, team-based work.

The open, modern designs maximize collaboration, natural light, and operational flexibility. Both spaces have multiple and varied office resources for employees to work both independently and in teams, such as individual workstations, focused/quiet work areas, unstructured space, and collaborative workspaces with different technology resources.

The Boston office, located within the Prudential Tower, was performed under an accelerated design process; the planning and design would then inform the new 110,000 SF Waltham location

After designing Robinson+Cole’s 40,000 sf space in 1997, Margulies Perruzzi was once again retained to renovate their space at One Boston Place. Previously consisting of offices and conference rooms, MP transformed their space on the 26th floor into the main reception area as well as a conference center, which will accommodate larger, more public gatherings.

Due to advances in technology, there was a significant reduction in the firm’s law library since most information sourcing is now performed online. That extra space was transformed into a collaboration area. The main conference room was planned to be very large to accommodate corporate document review and signings and other large-team events. The room can be flexibly split into two ten-person meeting spaces when the full-sized space is not required.

MP also refreshed the design on the 25th floor to give it a more updated aesthetic, representing the firm’s growth and change in brand and culture.

Sustainability

This project is certified LEED-Gold.

Ceiling clouds float below an exposed structure in many areas, creating a dramatic effect of height and a less traditional feel.

Avalon Bay’s move to the 20th floor of the Federal Reserve building was symbolic of the substantial success the company has had in the real estate investment market. Even with a high percentage of offices (versus workstations), leadership was committed to assuring that everyone had full visual access to both the harbor and downtown. This was achieved partly by creating a café immediately adjacent to the reception area, so that anyone entering or leaving the space could enjoy the window line. [BP]The adjacent training room has a moveable glass partition such that full-company gatherings and hosted events could likewise take advantage of the view. Additionally, staggered breaks in the ring of offices offer staff an easy connection to the perimeter.

One aspect of the design that is particularly striking is the treatment of the ceilings. To reinforce the size of the open spaces, ceiling clouds float below an exposed structure in many areas, creating a dramatic effect of height and a less traditional feel. Coupled with stunning artwork and graphics, sparkling light fixtures and subtle variances of color and texture, the result is a breathtakingly beautiful workplace for a company that knows and values design.