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BOSTON – May 3, 2022– Margulies Perruzzi (MP), one of New England’s most innovative architectural and interior design firms, announced today that it has completed work on a 4,000 SF simulation lab for Lahey Hospital & Medical Center (LHMC) in Burlington, Mass., a world-renowned tertiary academic medical center known for its innovative technology, pioneering medical treatment and leading-edge research. This is the seventh project Margulies Perruzzi has designed for LHMC. Other projects include Endoscopy department, MRI suite improvements, COVID testing site, 18-bed Intensive/Progressive Care Unit, Pathology Lab improvements, and a Wet Lab.

At LHMC’s Professional Development and Samuel and Nancy Jo Altschuler Simulation Center, providers work in a realistic health care setting using the latest technology and training methods to learn new techniques, strengthen teamwork and optimize their response to crises and unanticipated events. Simulators provide a structured learning experience and allow providers to practice new skills and procedures without risk to patients. Many simulation centers are built off-site but Dmitry Nepomnayshy, MD, director of the Professional Development and Samuel & Nancy Jo Altschuler Simulation Center at LHMC, had a vision for a simulation lab located within the main campus of the hospital and accessible 24/7.

“LHMC is committed to offering extensive skills training for our professional staff and dedicated to safety and the quality of care we offer our patients. The simulation center has become an indispensable component of our overarching vision to provide the best quality care possible to our community,” said Nepomnayshy. “We worked closely with the design team, and they understood our vision and the limitations we were facing by using existing space within the hospital but were able to create a flexible space which will support our simulation training.”

The design team focused on the functionality of the simulation space and created realistic clinical spaces for the most accurate learning experience for the users, while incorporating LHMC’s standard calming hospitality-like design aesthetics. Providing a functional operating and exam room, supplemented by simulation spaces, an observation room and a classroom, were important to the success of this space for teaching and training. A control room in the middle of the space straddles the operating room and patient room allowing observers to oversee simulations. The classroom incorporates a moveable wall system so the space can flex between small and large groups depending on the courses being offered. Providing glass to the corridor visually opens up the space and allows for more observation of those being trained. The final product is an inviting space which is open 24/7 and includes a kitchenette featuring a lounge with soft seating, storage room, and office space.

MP healthcare projects benefit from principal-level engagement from programming and planning through post-occupancy evaluations. Its healthcare experts are local to Boston, familiar with state and federal requirements for projects in New England. They use this expertise to lead user group meetings in real time, resolving complex planning issues during the meeting, which reduces meetings and helps expedite the project. MP’s scope of services includes programming and planning, site evaluation and clinical test fits, ground up construction, interior design, sustainable design, WELL Building, and LEAN process improvement.

Project team members include:

  • Architect/Laboratory Planning: Margulies Perruzzi
  • Construction Manager: Columbia Construction
  • MEP/FP: R.W. Sullivan and CMTA
  • Audio Visual: Red Thread
  • Simulation Training & Technology: Simulation IQ

Partnering with Array Architects, a leader in healthcare planning and design, Margulies Perruzzi focused on incorporating as much access to daylight and nature as possible to leverage its clinical benefits. The team collaborated to situate activity rooms and common areas along the exterior walls of the building to bring in natural light and views of the Maine landscape for both patient and staff areas. Windows were maintained at patient areas while safety glass and borrowed light concepts  were used to bring daylight deeper into the building. Art highlighting nature is incorporated at various seating areas throughout the unit to bring nature inside the building.

The new inpatient unit is secured with access through an interlocking sally port and features 20 double occupancy rooms, each with its own bathroom. To ensure the safety of patients, each room is designed to minimize ligature risk to provide both privacy and safety. Anti-ligature fixtures were used in the bathrooms and bedrooms as well as vandal proof ceilings. The design team used institutional materials with a residential look and feel to help reduce stress by providing a home-like feel for patients on the unit.

Read the full article featured in Healthcare Snapshots.

By Monica Moreira Audette, AIA, LEED AP, Associate Partner and Senior Project Manager at Margulies Perruzzi

A lot more goes into renovating an older Class B building into a Class A than just adding a coffee bar or flat screen TV in the lobby. If it were that easy, all Class B building owners would upgrade. A big part of the decision to renovate a Class B building is the owner’s appetite for risk and how far they are willing to go to achieve a higher rate of return on their property.

It is not a decision any owner can make quickly. Owners will have to methodically weigh the pros and cons of trading the safety and stability of a Class B building for the cachet of Class A. The indicators are nearly endless – tenant demand, the economic forecast, sector growth, businesses that are expanding and/or contracting, emerging space trends (open floor plans, high-end amenities), and changing work styles that require more flexible space.

Office, industrial, retail, warehouse and biotech space have different conditions and variables that cannot be compared across the board. For instance, renovating warehouse space in one region makes sense to accommodate the demand from large retail tenants like Amazon that have specific needs, while in another market it would be a poor investment. The same goes for biotech space – upgrading buildings in a bullet-proof market like Cambridge is a no-brainer but biotech tenants have very specific needs that make renovating a building a costly endeavor.

What to Weigh

Given that the conditions can vary so dramatically from market to market, owners need to look closely at both the micro and macro conditions before considering future renovation plans. They should avoid basing their decisions on what their neighbors are doing given that the building condition, access to capital and the type of tenant improvements will differ.

Converting Class B buildings to A in fail-proof or constrained markets reduces risk. Property owners and managers should pay close attention to market research for leasing trends and supply and demand. The vacancy rate of a property is a crucial factor in the decision-making process for owners who may want to stagger improvements.

Class B buildings in markets where there are high vacancy rates may have a better chance at adding value by making minor changes like upgrading mechanical and operating systems to increase their building’s efficiency rather than a full-scale renovation. If the building is in a market where there is weak demand for Class A space, staying put in Class B until there is a shift could be the best strategy.

Property owners whose buildings have not been properly maintained or have fallen into disrepair are unlikely to be able to justify retrofitting buildings with touchless, digital technology that will play a big role in landing a tenant. Property owners who are planning to retain assets for the long-term have more financial cushion to make investments that will pay off in the future, increasing rents and elevating the class of the property. Those in the game for the short-term who do not have access to capital will favor less costly facelifts over renovation, leaving the new owners the opportunity to add value.

Building owners and managers should enlist a team of experts who can assist in determining the best course in repositioning office buildings. Evaluating the real estate market, comparable properties, and tenant demand will provide a solid starting point to formulate a plan for repositioning a commercial property.

A Medical Makeover in West End

When asset manager DWS Group decided to renovate 50, 60, and 62 Staniford Street in Boston’s West End neighborhood to transform the 70’s era complex into a first-class medical office building they hired Margulies Perruzzi to outline the process from navigating construction with tenants in the building to the Boston planning process.

DWS’ goal was to improve the tenant experience, increase access and add high-quality building features near medical/research institutions such as Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriner’s Hospitals for Children, and Mass. Eye & Ear to attract new tenants.

We evaluated every detail and devised a design scheme that included reducing disruption to tenants to securing city approvals to increasing the building’s Planned Development Area.

Our strategy included connecting 50 and 60 Staniford Streets which increased the ground floor and first floor by 20,000 SF. It also created new space for medical office, dry research, and retail tenants.

The Staniford complex now features a 10-story medical office tower and a new, two-story medical office building with space for retail tenants. The investment by DWS created a premier medical/office space, increasing the value of the complex, and improved access to high-quality space ideal for medical office/retail users.

Article featured in Banker & Tradesman.

A recent project shows the value of designing to maximize daylighting in a space.

Southern Maine Health Care, in partnership with Maine Behavioral Healthcare, engaged Margulies Perruzzi and Array Architects to renovate a 24,000 SF unit, creating 40 new beds across two floors, and to design a five-bed Emergency Department Acute Psychiatric (EDAP) unit. This project triples the number of short stay behavioral healthcare beds available in York County, Maine.

The design team focused on incorporating as much access to daylight and nature as possible to leverage its clinical benefits. The team collaborated to situate activity rooms and common areas along the exterior walls of the building to bring in natural light and views of the Maine landscape for both patient and staff areas. Windows were maintained at patient areas while safety glass and borrowed light concepts were used to bring daylight deeper into the building. Art highlighting nature is incorporated at various seating areas throughout the unit to bring nature inside the building.

“The design team did a great job of listening to how we care for our patients and how we would be using the space. The new units will allow us to deliver a higher level of care to behavioral health patients,” said Diane Mankus, RN, senior director of behavioral health services at Southern Maine Health Care.

Read the full article featured in Building Operating Management.

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Margulies Perruzzi (MP), one of New England’s most innovative architectural and interior design firms, and Sladen Feinstein Integrated Lighting (SFIL), one of Boston’s premier architectural lighting design firms, announced today that they have received a Section Award of Merit from the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) for the Illumination Awards program. The award recognizes the firms’ lighting design for the 250,000 SF global headquarters for PTC Inc. (PTC), a global provider of technology that transforms how companies design, manufacture, operate, and service things in a smart connected world.

Margulies Perruzzi (MP), one of New England’s most innovative architectural and interior design firms, announced today that it has completed renovations and a two-story addition at 69 A Street in South Boston, creating a five-story 45,000 SF building that is the first “cross-laminated timber” (CLT) addition to an existing building in downtown Boston

The notable design accomplishment is that the building expansion would not have been feasible without the innovative use of CLT.  This lightweight (and highly sustainable) structural system enabled the addition to be added to the 1920s era brick and beam former Rivet factory without replacing the existing foundations or columns, which would have been impossible with a standard steel or concrete structure. The exterior skin of the new levels is a metal panel rainscreen system installed with exposed metal fasteners that speak to its original use. Leaving the CLT exposed on the upper floors creates a much more appealing wood interior than standard steel construction. As the existing building is constructed directly on the lot line, Margulies Perruzzi arranged for setbacks to allow for additional light on the South side.

A new entrance mid- building is accessed via a landscaped courtyard, allowing generously enlarged windows on A Street.  All the windows were replaced, but the existing building’s windows are distinguished from the new windows on the upper floors by being multi-light, which is consistent with the originals.  An open-air terrace directly off the fifth floor looks west toward the Boston skyline.

A major part of this project was the zoning approval process, including coordination with the BPDA and the community before any construction could begin, and regular communication with the abutters throughout the construction period. DBI Projects, a top project management and real estate advisory firm with a diverse range of clients, was the owner’s representative for the project and successfully shepherded the project team through its successful completion.

With the building core and shell complete, it is now ready to be occupied by the next generation of tenants to be attracted to the revitalization of this part of South Boston.

The project team for 69 A Street includes:

  • Architect: Margulies Perruzzi
  • Construction Manager: Commodore Builders
  • Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) Engineer: WB Engineers
  • Structural Engineer: McNamara Salva
  • Owner’s Project Manager: DBI Projects

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“Margulies Perruzzi captured our vision and created a space that is light-filled, flexible, and modern,” said Alex Baker, chief operating officer at JSI. “The design team created a warm environment featuring jewel tones and elements of nature, and our new office space adds to the overall experience for our employees.”

 

BOSTON – July 20, 2021 – Margulies Perruzzi (MP), one of New England’s most innovative architectural and interior design firms, has taken an active role working with health care clients to meet the demands of the COVID-19 pandemic and recently worked with Lahey Hospital & Medical Center (LHMC) in Burlington, Mass., to create a 3,100 SF COVID-19 testing lab.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals and providers across the Commonwealth worked in numerous capacities to respond to COVID-19, caring for thousands of patients, re-configuring care settings, and endlessly innovating to meet the rapidly changing demands of this pandemic.  Throughout this time, hospitals needed to find new ways to meet the growing demands for COVID-19 testing and analysis and support the achievement of the Commonwealth’s goals to grow testing capacity in the state, which was critical to ensuring robust diagnostic testing and surveillance of the spread of the disease.

Lahey Hospital & Medical Center, a world-renowned tertiary medical center known for its innovative technology, pioneering medical treatment and leading-edge research, committed to more than doubling its existing COVID-19 testing capacity to meet the demand. The renovation of existing lab space created a new expanded COVID-19 testing lab with rapid throughput testing capabilities of up to 11,100 tests per day that would allow specimens to be resulted in 24 hours or less.

“To make a project like this happen requires an enormous amount of collaboration and alignment to ensure the entire team is working together to meet the project goals,” said Bob Humenn, AIA, director of healthcare strategy at Margulies Perruzzi. “The project team worked closely with LHMC to be sure the lab design would meet their current testing needs as well as future testing requirements.”

Margulies Perruzzi and Columbia Construction worked with LHMC to create a COVID-19 testing lab designed to accommodate new and larger equipment.  The design/construction team was challenged to complete the COVID-19 testing lab as quickly as possible to meet the immediate needs for COVID-19 testing during the pandemic.  Multiple sites on- and off-campus were explored, and it was determined that creating the COVID-19 testing lab within the main campus laboratory would have the greatest capital and operational cost efficiency. This approach could also be built in the shortest time because the mechanical infrastructure was already in place.  The challenge with this option was restrictions on planning based on available space in the existing lab. Creating sufficient contiguous space needed for the Thermofisher testing equipment involved multiple moves of existing lab services and required renovation within an existing functioning laboratory. There were several strategies to accelerate the process, including team working sessions for material approvals and finishes flexibility to work with materials more readily available. Utilizing quick ship options for materials with unavoidably long lead times and using movable lab furniture to provide more flexibility for delivery, assembling and installation.

“LHMC moved quickly during the pandemic to meet the urgent demand for testing services. It was important that the lab could process a lot of tests quickly, but the space needed to be efficient and functional also. The design and construction teams helped us achieve our goals by taking a more proactive role to address issues immediately as they arose to ensure the new lab could open quickly for the benefit of our patients, colleagues and physicians,” said Michael Slejzer, director of planning, design and construction at LHMC.

Project team members include:

  • Architect/Laboratory Planning: Margulies Perruzzi
  • Construction Manager: Columbia Construction
  • Owner’s Project Manager: Lehrer Cummings
  • MEP/FP: BR+A
  • Commissioning: CMTA

About Margulies Perruzzi

As one of New England’s top architectural and interior design firms, Margulies Perruzzi (MP) designs Workplace, Health, Science, and Real Estate projects that inspire and nurture human endeavor. More information may be found at https://mparchitectsboston.com.